Pork Ramen Noddle

Pork Ramen Noddle

This is how I layer my Pork Ramen Noddle: I make the pork, mushrooms and broth separately. And then, it’s the layers of ingredients that make all the difference.

You can also watch a video of me and my daughter, Bianca, making this dish on You Tube.

 

Pork Ramen Noddle

Serves 4

 

4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1 pound cremini mushrooms, quartered

1 shallot, finely minced

Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper

1 pound pre-cooked pulled pork

1 onion, sliced

1 pound ramen noodles, cooked

2 scallions, white and green parts, cut ion the bias

2 hard-boiled eggs, cut in half

6 cups reduced sodium beef broth

2 radishes, cut into thin stripes

2 baby cucumbers, sliced

1 cup cilantro leaves (not chopped)

 

  • Prepare the mushrooms: heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan on high heat. Add the mushrooms and cook, without stirring until it starts to release its oil, about 3 minutes. Add the shallots, and season with salt and pepper. Mix everything and cook until mushrooms are soft and tender, about 5 minutes all together. Transfer to a plate and let cool.
  • Prepare the Pork: using the same pan as the mushrooms, heat the remaining olive oil and add the sliced onions. Season with salt and pepper and cook, stirring frequently with a wooden spoon until it soft and translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the pulled pork and break it up in pieces, making sure pork is completely broken up into thin threads. Cook, stirring frequently until pork is completely flavored. Add about ¼ cup water if necessary. Season with salt and pepper. Transfer to a plate and let cool.
  • Meanwhile, heat the beef broth and make sure it’s well seasoned.
  • To assemble the Ramen Soup, place some cooked noodles, about ¼ cup pulled pork and some mushrooms in a bowl. Ladle the broth on top, and garnish with the scallions, cucumbers, radish, eggs and cilantro. Serve immediately.

 

 

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Burritos Recipe

Rice & Beans Burritos

Rice & Beans Burritos

I’m always fascinated by the assembly line at Chipoltle. My son Thomas, who is crazy for the restaurant always asks for Rice & Beans Burritos and I always tell him we should make it at home. We never did—until quarantine forced us to! You can see in this video how easy it is to put together this burrito recipe— and any burrito! You can stuff your burrito with just about anything: meat sauce and corn, add lettuce and sour cream, add rice and beans and meat, or chicken, or pulled pork, or guacamole, or salsa, or cheese or queso blanco, or just about anything and any combination that you might think of. The concept is more important that the items. You can simply look at the leftovers you have in the fridge and decide to put a burrito recipe together!

 

Makes 2

 

2 Flour tortillas

1 cup cooked brown rice, hot

1 cup cooked black eyed peas, hot

1 cup cooked, chopped meat, hot

½ cup freshly cut tomatoes

½ cup freshly sliced scallions

½ cup freshly chopped parsley

1 avocado, pitted, peeled and cubed

 

Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add one tortilla at a time, changing the sides and making sure the tortilla is just heated through and just begins to blister. Place on top on a foil sheet. Add rice, beans, meat and all other garnished to each tortilla and roll up tightly, burrito style. Repeat with the remaining tortillas and fillings. Once assembled, you can heat again in the pre-heated oven for 5 minutes, or simply eat them soft, just as they are assembled. Serve with a salad and you have a beautiful meal without having to out to a Mexican restaurant!

 

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Leticia

 

 

 

 

Passover Brisket Recipe

Passover Brisket with Prunes & Carrots

Passover Brisket

A few years ago, I participated in a fun event at Temple Israel Synagogue of Westport, CT, where I was one of the judges for a brisket throwdown competition. Although we used the term “competition” to announce the event, it was really a celebration of brisket recipes, of cooking and community coming together. Brisket is one of those dishes, where each family has its own traditional recipe. Until then, my association with brisket always brought memories of meat smothered in ketchup with too much sugar and too little salt. As I sampled one brisket after another, I realized that this association was frozen in my mind through some kind of one-time bad experience and the world of brisket is worth looking forward to. Brisket should be cooked like any tough, beefy cut: seasoned with salt and pepper, seared until deeply browned, strewn with aromatics and braised until fall-apart tender.

This recipe for Brisket with Prunes and Carrots, inspired by the amazing chef Lauren Braun Costello (author of The Competent Cook and Notes on Cooking) was just incredible. I made some mild changes to her original recipe, but the result is amazing! You want to brown the meat on top of the stove and then cook it in the oven low and slow. Blend the sauce to a rich spoonable liquid. And yeah, of course there will be some hit (in this case chipotle powder) because every hunk of meat deserves some heat!

As we brave this Passover all on our own during times of social distancing, I ‘d like to wish everyone who’s reading and/or cooking this and any recipe in this site, the most wonderful Passover!

May we heal and thrive together!

 

 

Passover Brisket with Prunes & Carrots

Inspired by chef Lauren Braun Costello

Serves 10-12 people

 

For the Spice Rub:

4 cubes beef bullion

½ teaspoon onion powder

½ teaspoon parsley flakes

¼ teaspoon paprika

¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

 

For the Brisket:

One 7-8 lb brisket (not too lean)

Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper

4 garlic cloves, minced

3 large onions, chopped

2 teaspoon chipotle powder or chili powder

One 12 oz bottle beer

1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce

8 carrots, peeled and cut into sixths

1 cup pitted prunes

One 3-inch cinnamon stick

 

Pre-heat the oven to 325˚F.

In a small bowl mix all the ingredients for the dry rub together. Pat the brisket dry and season all sides generously with salt and pepper. Heat a Dutch oven over medium high heat and add the brisket. Cook 5 minutes per side until nicely browned and the fat renders. Remove the brisket from the pan and set aside.

Add the garlic in the Dutch oven using the fat rendered from the brisket and cook until it just starts to turn golden. Be careful as the pan is already hot, so it will cook fast. Add the onions and chipotle powder and cook, stirring occasionally with a wooden spoon, until softened, about 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, add the spice rub evenly to both sides of the already seared brisket. Return the brisket to the pan on top of the onion mixture. Pour the beer and Worcestershire. Place the carrots, prunes and cinnamon stick around the brisket and cover the pot. Place the pot in the oven and cook for 3 hours, checking once in a while to make sure the liquid level is good. If it seems a little dry, add ½ to 1 cup water.

Remove the pot from the oven and let the brisket rest inside the pan for at least 30 minutes before opening. Remove the brisket from the pot and transfer to a cutting board. Slice the brisket on the bias, against the grain and arrange on a platter.

Using a slotted spoon, remove the carrots and prunes and distribute nicely along the meat. Cover with foil to keep moist.

Remove the cinnamon and any other large pieces of cooked meat or cooked vegetables. Using a ladle, transfer the remaining cooking liquid and puree in a blender. Pour the blended sauce on top of the meat/carrot prune making sure it’s covering all of the meat.

 

 

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Yaniv Cohen is The Spice Detective

Yaniv Cohen is The Spice Detective

Israel! Israel! Israel! All of a sudden whenever anyone talks about Mediterranean cuisine, they inevitably go on about Israeli cuisine and how it’s now infamous at top restaurants, recipes, and cookbooks!

I know Israel is amazing: I spent time in a youth program as a student and visited the country as a tourist. But that was many years ago. I can’t wait to visit again. Right now, I’m traveling to Israel in my own American kitchen. Have you seen the amount of Israeli cookbooks that hit the market in recent years?

I guess Jerusalem, by Yotam Otolenghi started a huge trend, not only highlighting the creativity of its people and the beauty of its ingredients, but putting Israeli cuisine on the map for the first time. And the second, third, and fourth cookbook that followed the success of the first. For a cookbook author myself, falling in love with other cookbooks is a constant in my life.

Then I visited Zahav, in Philadelphia, by acclaimed chef Michael Solomonov, which quickly became another obsession. And it led to more Israeli cookbooks on the shelf. Then another incredible cookbook became my all-time favorite: Sababa, written by my dear friend Adeena Sussman’s tribute to Israeli cuisine.

Lately, I had the honor to meet yet another Israeli chef, whom I had the pleasure to work with on a recent trip to Los Angeles. Yaniv Cohen, also known as The Spice Detective , is based in Miami and operates Jaffa restaurant, a food joint located on the Roch Market Miami that serves Israeli influenced cuisine.

After working on an incredible cooking project, we shared a ride on the way to the airport, and he gave me a copy of his cookbook My Spiced Kitchen.

My Spiced Kitchen

Yaniv’s book takes us through a word of spices, deciphering each and every flavor, pairing ingredients and flavors and creating champion recipes. The more I turned the pages, the more I wanted to cook from his book.

With a dinner party scheduled for two days after landing, it wasn’t a hard decision to choose this Short Ribs recipe with Silan and Nigella Seeds.

In this blog post, I take you step by step through Yaniv’s delicious recipe.

 

Braised Short Ribs with Eggplant and Nigela Seeds

 

Short Ribs with Eggplant, Silan and Nigela Seeds

By Yaniv Cohen

Adapted from My Spiced Kitchen

Serves 4

 

Ingredients:

2 lbs beef short ribs, cut into individual ribs, clean or extra fat

Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper

1 cup white flour

4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1 large onion, diced

4 cloves garlic, slivered

¼ cup Silan (date syrup)

2 tablespoons nigella seeds

1 tablespoon Iraqui Baharar

2 cups chopped tomatoes (peeled and seeded)

1 eggplant cut into medium cubes

3 cups beef stock

2 tablespoons freshly chopped parsley

 

Procedure:

Center a rack in the middle of the oven and pre-heat it to 325˚F.

Season the meat on both sides with salt and pepper and dredge lightly in flour, shaking the excess. Heat the olive oil in a Dutch-oven pan or any other large pan over medium heat and cook the veal shanks until they are lightly brown and crispy on both sides, about 5 minutes per side. Remove from the pan and transfer to a bowl. Cover with foil to keep moist.

Add the garlic to the pan (add a bit more oil oif necessary; remove some oil if necessary) and cook until it just starts to get golden, about 1 minute. Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally with a wooden spoon until it becomes translucent.

Add the tomatoes, silan and baharara and cook until they are hot, about 2 minutes.

Return the short ribs to the pan, and fit them all inside, nestling them one close to the other, preferably in one layer. Cover the pan with the lid and place the pot in the oven. Cook for 1 1/2 hours, checking the liquid level every half an hour, making sure there is plenty of liquid.

After about 1 ½ hours of cooking, Carefully remove the pan from the oven, add the eggplant cubes making sure they are nice distributed in the pan, cover the pan again, and return to the oven for another 1 hours, depending on the sixe of the short ribs. You want the meat to be falling off the bones and the sauce to display greay body and flavor.

When the short ribs are done, remove from the oven, and let the meat rest inside the pan, off the heat, but with the lid still on for a good 2 to 3 hours (just forget about it and go do something else.) You can make this up to 7 days ahead of time, keep in the fridge in a plastic container fitted with a tight lid and reheat the day of serving.

Garnish with nigella seeds and parsley.

Braised Short Ribs wth Eggplant & Nigela Seeds

 

I’m so happy that you visited! Thanks for reading and browsing my site!

If you like what you read, tell your friends about it.

I’d love to connect with you! Please do send comments and suggestions,

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Contact me!

And remember always,

Cook at home! Body Up! Health up! Wise up!

See you next time!

Leticia

 

Veal Scaloppine

Veal Scaloppine for Dinner

So, you need to feed a family of 4? I got you! The moment I started preparing for this delicious Veal Scaloppine, I knew it was a keeper. I usually buy the veal already cut into thin slices, but you can easily do it yourself but cutting a thin piece from the eye round and then pounding between 2 pieces of plastic wrap. Beef or chicken are just as good. Have fun!

Veal Scaloppine

Serves 4

1 ½ lbs veal cutlets

½ cup all-purpose flour

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

½ teaspoon paprika

¼ teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg

3 tablespoons olive oil, more as needed

1 shallot, finely chopped

1 ½ cups chicken stock

1 stick butter

1 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice

1 tablespoon freshly chopped parsley

 

  • Prepare the Veal Scaloppine: Season the veal on both sides with salt and pepper. Place the flour in a small bowl, and season with salt, pepper, paprika and nutmeg and mix well. Spread the flour on a sheet pan. Dredge each piece of veal in flour on both sides, shaking off the excess.

  • Pour 1 tablespoon of the olive oil on a large skillet over medium heat, and swirl the oil to cover the pan. Working in batches (very important! You only want to add one layer of veal at a time. It takes me 3 batches to cook the veal), add 3-4 pieces of veal to the pan and cook until it just starts to turn very lightly golden on each side, about 2 minutes per side. Repeat the procedure with all of the veal, and as they get cooked, place them on a shallow dish covered with aluminum foil to keep moist. Add more olive oil to each batch as you cook the veal.
  • Prepare the Sauce: Add shallots to the pan (if your pan is dry, add another tablespoon or so of olive oil to the pan) and cook, stirring frequently with a wooden spoon until it just cooked through, about 2 minutes.

  • Add the chicken stock and let it come to a full boil, then reduce the heat and let the stock concentrate and reduce by half, about 5 minutes.
  • Add the butter in pieces (make sure heat is at a bare minimum, as the heat can break the butter. If you don’t feel sure, turn the heat completely off— the butter will still melt, but keep whisking). When the butter is completely melted, the sauce should have some consistency to it, and remember, do not boil a butter sauce, so maintain heat at minimum. Add the lemon juice, and the veal pieces to the sauce. Cover the pan and warm everything together for 5 minutes, allowing the veal to braise gently in the sauce and become nice and tender. Distribute veal scaloppine onto 4 warm plates and spoon warm sauce on top. Garnish with parsley.

 

I’m so happy that you visited today! Thanks for reading and browsing my site!

If you like what you read, tell your friends about it,

I’d love to connect with you! Please do send comments and suggestions,

If you prepare any of the recipes on the site, snap a photo and send it to me!

Follow my food adventures on Instagram !

And remember always,

Cook at home! Body Up! Health up! Wise up!

See you next time!

Leticia

Osso-Bucco: Touchdown At The Table!

Osso-Bucco: Touchdown At The Table!

Here is one of the most praised dishes a cook can cook. Yep! If you make a good Osso-Buco (which are veal shanks) you will hear many compliments from your guests. Just follow the yellow brick road! Best of all, you can actually make this dish a good 7 to 10 days ahead of time, and it re-heats really well. That means, if you have a dinner party on a Saturday night, you can make it the weekend before, and it will taste just perfect. Trust me. I learned this when I used to work at La Caravelle, back in the late 1990’s and this dish was one of their signatures on the menu. In fact, Osso Buco, like many other stewed recipes, tastes even better a few days after it’s made.

You can serve this dish with a Risotto Milanese (recipe follows), the classic Italian way, or you can serve with a variety of starches like polenta, plain risotto, orzo or basmati rice.

 

Osso Bucco A la Milanese

Serves 6 people

 

For the Osso Bucco:

One 28-ounce can whole, peeled tomatoes, preferably imported

6 veal shanks, tied firmly with string

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

All-purpose flour, about ½ cup, for dredging the meat

2 tablespoons olive oil

4 cloves garlic, finely chopped

1 large onion, chopped

2 celery stalks, chopped

2 carrots, chopped

1 bay leaf

3 sprigs thyme, picked leaves

½ cup dry white wine or vermouth

1½ cup veal or chicken stock (preferably home-made or deli bought, but avoid the boxed product)

 

For the Risotto Milanese:

4 cups chicken stock (preferably home-made or deli bought)

large pinch saffron thread

1 tablespoon unsalted butter

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 small onion, chopped finely

1 ½ cup Arborio rice

½ cup dry white wine

¼ cup freshly chopped parsley for garnish

 

  1. Prepare the Osso-Buco: Center a rack in the middle of the oven and pre-heat it to 325˚F.
  2. Cut the tomatoes into pieces and reserve the juices. Set aside.
  3. Season the meat on both sides with salt and pepper and dredge lightly in flour, shaking the excess. Heat the olive oil in a Dutch-oven pan or any other large pan over medium heat and cook the veal shanks until they are lightly brown and crispy on both sides, about 5 minutes per side. Remove from the pan and transfer to a bowl. Cover with foil to keep moist.
  4. Add the garlic and cook until it just starts to turn brown, about 2 minutes. (You might need to add a bit more oil at this point.) Add the onion, celery, carrot, bay leaf, and thyme and cook, stirring frequently with a wooden spoon until vegetables are soft and tender, about 10 minutes.
  5. Add the tomatoes and juice and continue to cook.
  6. Add the wine and let it cook and evaporate almost completely.
  7. Add the chicken or veal stock and bring to a boil. Return the veal shanks to the pan, and fit them all inside, nestling them one close to the other, preferably in one layer. Cover the pan with the lid, and place the pot in the oven. Cook for 2 to 2 ½ hours, checking the liquid level every half an hour, making sure there is plenty of liquid, about half way through the meat should be fine. If need be, add a little. If the meat is falling off the bone—it’s done. If it’s not, return to the oven for another 30 minutes or so.
  8. When the veal shanks are done, remove from the oven, and let the meat rest inside the pan, off the heat, but with the lid still on for a good 2 to 3 hours (just forget about it and go do something else.)
  9. You can make this up to 7 days ahead of time, keep in the fridge in a plastic container fitted with a tight lid and reheat the day of serving.
  10. For the Risotto Milanese: In a medium saucepan bring the stock to a simmer with the saffron threads.
  11. In another large, heavy saucepan, melt the butter and olive oil. Add the onion and cook, stirring frequently, until soft and translucent, about 2 minutes.
  12. Add the rice and stir frequently, until the grains are warm, shiny, and coated with the onion mixture, about 3 minutes.
  13. Add the wine and bring to a boil until the liquid is almost absorbed, about 2 minutes.
  14. Slowly add one ladle of simmering stock and allow the rice to cook, stirring often, until the liquid is absorbed. Adjust the heat to maintain a gentle simmer. Add another ladle, and repeat the process. Continue adding ladles of stock, only when the previous addition has been completely absorbed. Cook until the rice is tender but still firm to the bite, 18 to 20 minutes. Don’t let the risotto get too thick; if the rice seems to have absorbed all of the liquid, add another tablespoon or so of stock to achieve the right creamy consistency. Taste the dish, check for flavor and doneness.
  15. To Serve: Arrange the risotto on the bottom of large warm plates. Place each veal shank on top of the rice, spoon a generous amount of sauce on top and garnish with parsley. Serve immediately.
Step by Step Chicken-Stuffed Beef Roulade

Step by Step Chicken-Stuffed Beef Roulade

 

Chicken Stuffed-Beef Roulade

Chicken Stuffed-Beef Roulade

Meat stuffed with chicken, a specialty from Goias. Wait. What? At first, it seems like an odd combination but when you taste, you’ll love it! The roulade is slowly roasted and presents a spectrum of textures: crusty and flaky meat around the edges and moist ground chicken stuffing packed with aromatic flavors in the center, this roulade is succulent and rich.

Truth be told: this is not the easiest of dishes, and it needs to rest in the refrigerator for a day. Yet, it is my kind of dish. There is some work and technique involved, especially when it comes to butterflying and tying the meat. I must confess I have never mastered the butcher’s way of using twine, and the two endings of this meat log always suffer from my poor tying skills (I am working on it!). Even though I don’t make the most perfect embroidery, once roasted, it looks gorgeous and tastes sublime.

 

Serves 6 to 8

 

1 flank steak (around 1 ½ pounds)

3/4 pound ground chicken (mixed from white and dark)

2 scallions (white and green parts), finely chopped (about ¼ cup)

1 stalk celery, finely chopped (about ¼ cup)

Half red onion, chopped (about ½ cup)

Half yellow bell pepper, finely chopped (about ½ cup)

Half red bell pepper, finely chopped (about ½ cup)

1 small carrot, finely diced (about 1/3 cup)

4 cloves garlic, minced (about 1 tablespoon)

¼ cup fresh parsley, chopped

3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1 tablespoon soy sauce

1 chicken bouillon cube, grated into powder

2 teaspoons Kosher salt

Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper

  1. Using a boning knife or a very sharp paring knife, trim any excess fat and silver skin from the flank steak. Carefully butterfly the meat, working across the grain and trying not to tear it. Start through one of the long edges and slowly cut deeper into the meat. Keeping the meat flat and the knife blade horizontal at all times will help with the job. When you reach the center, stop and open the meat as if it was a book (If you know a good butcher, don’t be shy to ask him to do it for you). Season both sides liberally with salt and pepper. Set aside while you prepare the filling.
  2. Place the ground chicken in a large bowl. Stir in the scallions, celery, red onion, bell peppers, carrot, garlic, parsley, one tablespoon of the olive oil, the soy sauce, and bouillon cube. Mix well. To check the seasoning, pinch off an egg-size piece and cook it in a hot skillet with a dash of oil. Season the rest of the filling with salt and pepper as necessary.
  3.  Place the ground meat mixture inside the opened flank steak, cut side up, and spread throughout the surface of the meat. Make sure to leave a 2-inch edge on all sides. The amount of stuffing may vary slightly, depending on the size of your flank steak.beef chicken roulade
  4. Carefully roll the flank steak making sure to fold some meat over the ends to avoid ground meat from escaping.chick beef roulade
  5. Tie the roulade with a string, making a knot in 5 to 6 places. Don’t worry if the ends are a little messy; as long as you tie it well, the dish will hold its shape.  Wrap the roulade in plastic wrap and keep it in the refrigerator for 1 day (or up to 2 days) so that the flavors have a chance to blend. Make sure to bring it to room temperature at least 30 minutes before proceeding.img_1509img_5523
  6. Pre-heat the oven to 225˚F.
  7. Warm the remaining olive oil in a large skillet over medium to high heat. Add the roulade and cook, rotating every 2 minutes until it forms a nice brown crust all over, about 8 minutes.
  8. Transfer to a cutting board and let it rest for about 10 minutes.
  9. Wrap the roulade in aluminum foil and seal the edges very tightly. Place seam side up pm a baking sheet on the center rack of the oven. Cook for about 2 hours, until you reach a 155˚F internal temperature. Save any juices that render and accumulate.
  10. Remove from the oven and let rest with the foil wrap closed, for about 15 minutes.
  11. Open the foil, pour any juices into a bowl, and place the meat onto a cutting board. Using a serrated knife cut ¾ -inch thick slices. Serve with the juices drizzled on top.
Steak With Mustard Sauce

Steak With Mustard Sauce

Steak with Mustard Onion Sauce

 Bife com Molho de Mostarda e Cebola

Steak with Mustard Onion Sauce

Steak with Mustard Onion Sauce

It is my intention to see everyone, and I mean everyone cooking Brazilian cuisine during the Olympics! And just to prove that Brazilian cooking is way easier, way more accessible and way more delicious that you can ever imagine, I have selected a few typical dishes to share with you.

This recipe is a bridge to Brazilian homey, comforting cooking, and you won’t find it too often in restaurant menus (mostly in home kitchens). You can make this recipe using one of the two mustards, but I like a combination of coarse and smooth Dijon mustard, and the different nuances brought by each. It’s affordable, easy to make, and absolutely delicious!

Discover just how good it is on a weeknight!

 

Steak with Mustard Onion Sauce

 Bife com Molho de Mostarda e Cebola

Serves 4

 

1½ lbs beef skirt steak, cut into 4 pieces

Kosher salt

Freshly ground pepper

2 tablespoon unsalted butter (more if needed)

2 medium onions, thinly sliced

3 tablespoons Dijon mustard

2 tablespoons coarse Dijon mustard

½ cup beef stock (or veal, or water)

½ cup heavy cream

2 tablespoons freshly chopped parsley

 

  • Season the meat with salt and pepper on both sides. Refrigerate the meat for at least 2 hours or preferably overnight. Let it come to room temperature at least 30 minutes before cooking. Heat a 12-inch heavy skillet over medium-high heat, add the butter, and swirl the pan around. Sear the steaks on both sides, until nice and crusty, lowering the heat as needed. Cook until they are done to your liking, about 2-3 minutes per side for medium-rare. Transfer to a plate and cover tightly with aluminum foil.
  • Add the onions to the pan, and cook on low heat, scraping the brown bits from the pan with a wooden spoon (add more butter if necessary) until the onions are soft and brownish with meat juices, about 5 minutes.
  • Add the two mustards and stir well.
  • Add the stock and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and add the heavy cream (don’t let it boil or cream will curdle) until the sauce develops a good body, and shows a light brown color, about 2-3 minutes.
  • Return the meat to the pan, and cook everything together until the meat is hot, about 2-3 minutes. Place the meat on warm plates, spoon the sauce on top, and garnish with fresh parsley.

 

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